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Projects

‘Zines and Paper Dreams’ with Artizine’s Ioana Simion

7 March 2021

Ioana Simion is the creative brains behind Artizine UK, a not for profit initiative which aims to connect communities together through zine-making workshops, kits, and creative activities.

She kindly agreed to join us at our latest meeting to share her insights into collaboration and the vision behind her zine-making initiative. Below we’ve shared some of her insights:

On collaboration:

“First, just think around you. Who can you immediately contact, and then their friends, and then the friends of their friends. And that’s kind of how I sparked my collaborations. And then Instagram is great. But with Instagram you do have to build a relationship with people. So the workshops I do now were just based around following each other, being active in each others feeds and stuff like that. I really love seeing stuff, so I pretty much follow everyone back who is a creative. And I really I’m just generally interested. So like, I comment I, I share on my stories… And I would like to think that Instagram is about building genuine connections and communities. People would be surprised that you don’t really have to come from the same industry to actually make something together.

On her live Artizine workshops:

Reusing and recycling:

“In our real life workshops, everything is sourced from donations. We will usually have like a pile of scraps. So we will never really use magazines and stuff like that. It will just be scraps, really, packaging, anything that we can reinvent and reinterpret. It’s all about hacktivism and craftivism.

Creating a safe space/environment:

“It’ll be quite a safe group. I like more intimate sessions. So we’ll be maybe 5, 6, 7 people. Because then, you know, the storytelling is a very important part of the workshop. I want people to feel like they belong and just be together, because I think just the act of getting together is quite political, in a way. Sometimes people really don’t want to talk and it’s okay because when you’re zine-making you’re quite into your own creative process, and a lot of people are very just immersed in that. So I just like letting them be like and saying “yeah, you can chill, it’s fine.” Some of the workshops will be quite long, actually. If there was someone that really enjoyed being in the space, I would just sit there for like three hours, you know, if I had the time.”

The Artizine ethos:

“I would say at the beginning of the session, “everything is free, you don’t have to give any money. But if you want, you can leave your zine at the end”. As in, “this is my creation. It’s part of Artizine now”. And You can come and create, you can bring back donations, or you can leave your zine. So we have this little archive of scenes. And it’s kind of like every workshop is a time capsule. When I look back at them, I know the person. You know, I remember Chloe – she did that beautiful zine. And it kind of just sits in my memory. And it’s very beautiful. It’s very close.”

On what’s next for Artizine:

“I’ve just started on these artist collaboration kits, which I’m super excited about. So I invite an illustrator to create a piece of art and then we sort of create a story around the artwork. So then you get an original art work and zine kit together, which I thought was quite cool. The first one that I’ve created with my good friend and illustrator Karolina Trhonova of 3 Angles Art is based around folklore and myth. I don’t want Artizine to just be about zine-making. I want it to be about music, anything that my friends are doing and people are interested in, but related back to zines of course.”

On the value of zine-making:

“What I love about zine-making is the accessibility. Everybody can make a zine and feel empowered. I love it because it’s based around unheard voices and unheard narratives, and I think this is what we need nowadays.”


Want to find out more? Why not connect with Artizine UK over on Instagram or Facebook? And be sure to check out Artizine’s upcoming Zoom workshop…we’ll see you there!

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Anita's Digest

Dust

Photo by Austin Ban on Unsplash

I heard a rumour that April was the cruelest month
Perhaps we mistake its love for dust
And its hugs for must
That envelops my skin
Cluttering what I think
As spring makes an early promise
I step out each day
As care
Towards my present
Particles of dust
Participants along my walk
Help me with a study of the past

My eyes itch
But early bloom lets me see a future
Filled with see you soons

Anita is a writer of all sorts. She has a background in Sociology and Gender Studies. Her main creative pursuits include poetry, short fiction, and articles on social and cultural topics. She often likes to play with the boundaries of fiction and non-fiction, exploring the liminal spaces between these styles. She’ll be updating this column weekly, with fresh, topical discussions about what’s on her mind. Stay tuned!
Categories
Blog

‘Christmas is…’

Our final Assemblage meeting of the year was full of festivities and we made this very speedy collaborative poem about our feelings surrounding Christmas time.

It brought up tradition as well as trepidation surrounding Christmas occurring in these strange times. Some of us reflected on the nostalgia surrounding the end of the year, others on familiarity and homeliness. We’d love to know what you think!

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Blog

Last minute gift ideas for creatives

Photo credit: @ionaceramics on Instagram

1. Ceramic gifts

These two beautiful jars by @ionaceramics on Instagram (above) are made from jade green porcelain and inspired by ripples on sand.

Photo credit: @birkimbags on Instagram

Metallic Tote bag style planter by Kimberley, @birkimbags on Instagram. She makes a range of planters and vases perfect for plant lovers.

Figure 1 Photo Credit Sculpd

Air drying clay craft sets by Sculpd, who also sell candle making kits. For ideas on what to make with your kit, check out their gallery page Best of Sculpd


2. Bullet Journalling

 Photo Credit: Journal Junkies

Highly rated is the A5 Leuchtturm 1917 dotted notebook (a firm favourite among journallers) with ink-proof paper that pens won’t show through.

Photo Credit: Tombow

Any new bullet journaller or avid fan of scrapbooking will also need pens, such as this dual brush pastel set from Tombow. These have a fine liner and brush heads for highlighting and underlining.


3. Culinary and home-growing gifts

 Photo Credit: WHSmith

Many creative people find an outlet in cooking, or in creating flavour combinations in drinks. This literary themed recipe book, Tequila Mockingbird has cocktails inspired by great books. 

Photo Credit Sous Chef

Sous Chef also has a range of cookbook and ingredient bundles such as this pack by Dishoom – modern Indian cuisine, which is a hit in its restaurants in London, Edinburgh and Manchester. 

For the green-fingered among us, a growing kit for herbs which accompany tea is ideal – this set includes fennel, chamomile and peppermint. The site also has this coffee plant for caffeinated friends and family. 

Other horticultural gifts include personalised tools which are perfect for indoor and outdoor growing. 


4. For artists in need of inspiration or encouragement

Photo Credit: Bookshop.org

Photo Credit: Present and Correct

For sketchers, budding painters and established artists, 365 Days of Art is a book of creative prompts from illustrator, designer and author Lorna Scobie (@lornascobie on Instagram)

A good stock of stationery is key to being prepared to make art on paper, and the London-originating company Cass Art stocks a range of sketchbook options for all budgets. Their gift collections vary from lino printing sets to oil paints, and they also have vouchers for indecisive gifters.

And for an owner of pens, pencils and implements this canvas pencil roll may be just the gift to store these compactly, from Present and Correct. 

 Photo Credit: Pinterest

And last but not least, this cool iridescent stapler from Poketo is brilliant, literally. 


5. Charity Wall art

Photo Credit: Creative Boom

Help Syrian refugee women in Lebanon by buying any from this selection of prints from Across Borders (available until the 20th of December on acrossborders.es) 


6. For photographic fun

Photo Credit: Urban Outfitters

Fujifilm Instax Mini polaroid cameras are popular for their ease of use and portability, allowing you to capture important moments whenever they happen and however you choose to display your printouts. This Sage colour is a lovely addition to the range, an Urban Outfitters exclusive.


7. For the Traveller

Photo Credit: Etsy

These customisable travel journals featured on Creative Boom are fantastic for people who like to explore, and come in a range of countries and cities from UK-based Fo!Design on Etsy.  


8. For soon-to-be lovers of a good ‘stitch n bitch’

Photo Credit: Cotton Clara

These embroidery kits from UK-based Cotton Clara are a great entry point for beginners and a nice gift for seasoned sewers too.

Photo Credit: Bookshop.org

And for the craftivists, Feminist Cross Stitch, the “ultimate subversive cross stitch book” available on Bookshop.org (remember Lorna Scobie from earlier? It’s in her shop!)

Hawthorn Handmade snowman needle felting

Also these two Christmassy kits featured in You Magazine would be a great way for someone to make their home festive.

Corinne Lapierre angel decorations kit

9. Abstract Lampshades for all your interior design needs

 Photo credit: Instagram and Instagram (@sparke______)

From Sparke Designs (Minnie Sparke Peck) or @sparke______ on Instagram, these hand painted commissioned lampshades are a beautiful addition to any room.


10. The most comfortable dungarees you may ever wear

Lucy and Yak’s range is produced sustainably in India and have become synonymous with casual eco chic. With classic corduroy in pastels and neutrals to loud statement limited edition pieces these are an autumn/winter (and spring!) wardrobe essential for lovers of comfort. 


11. Memberships

Photo Credit: Art Fund
Photo Credit: English Heritage
Photo Credit: Museums Association

For people who like galleries, heritage and generally wandering around an airy or historic space, there are annual passes from.

Along with a range of memberships available for individual institutions which are just a quick Google search away.

Libreria – Photo Credit: Secret London

For book lovers, a monthly subscription (fiction, non-fiction or child) to independent bookshop Libreria might also be a good idea.


12. And finally – other gift cards

These were featured by The Telegraph and would be suitable for people difficult to buy for:

A Bandcamp Giftcardwhere you can buy music, records and merch.

 Photo Credit: Candid Arts Trust

Candid Arts Trust LondonZoom Life drawing class voucher.


Extra ideas:

Ring making kit: https://www.notonthehighstreet.com/poshtottydesignscreates/product/personalised-silver-ring-making-kit?DGMKT=FID__TID_pla-4580496730137641_PID_799525_CRI_4580496730137641_ST_ring%20making%20kits&msclkid=9a29f4d7dc9d1ae403c0ab01a4c1aca2&utm_source=bing&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=UK_PLA_FGT_a.Catchall&utm_term=4580496730137641&utm_content=a.Catchall%20%7C%20Family%20%7C%20jewellery 

For colleagues – secret santahttps://www.creativeboom.com/features/if-you-think-secret-santa-is-rubbish-take-a-look-at-this-ungifted-solution-to-help-save-the-planet/


By Josie Eldridge

Categories
Projects

‘Being a Graphic Designer’ with Luthiem Escalona

5 December 2020

Luthiem Escalona is a freelance graphic designer who currently works mainly for the online knitting and crochet store Wool and the Gang. In this meeting, she introduced the collective to what graphic design is, as well as her career path, projects, and creative process. Below we have summarised some key points from her presentation:


What is Graphic Design?

  • Creating visual content to communicate a message
  • By using hierarchy, typography, colours, photography and illustration you can communicate a feeling or message
  • You see it all day every day, even if you might not realise it in:
    • packaging
    • logos
    • books
    • branding
    • websites
    • posters

Career path:

  1. Luthiem graduated with a BA in Graphic Design from the University of Herfordshire in 2017.
  2. She subsequently ended up getting an internship and later a full time job at Liberty London’s graphic studio as a junior graphic designer. Here she worked on mainly campaign identities, posters, signage, and window graphics. Above is an example of one of these designs.
  3. After a year at Liberty Luthiem decided to go freelance and now works predominantly for a company called Wool and the Gang, who focus on sustainability and slow fashion.

An example of Luthiem’s work for Wool and the Gang

What does a graphic designer do all day?

“I currently work 4 days a week at Wool and the Gang from Monday to Friday. While I’m there my day starts at 9am. We have a daily catch up at 10am, where we talk about what we’re working on the day, now that we’re all working from home. Then I’ll work on what I’ve been briefed in, paid ads, a newsletter, etc. Depending on the day I might have a meeting where we will talk about upcoming campaigns, how we think it should look, etc. I finish at 5:30pm!”

Luthiem

An example of a gift card Luthiem designed for a client

Creative process:

“It depends on the brief. Some clients are really set on what they would like, some others are a bit more open. But it’s always very important to know what needs to be communicated. Based on that it always helps me to write down a few key words that summarise the message.”

Luthiem

Step by step:

  1. Write down some key words. What is the message and who is it coming from?
  2. Create a moodboard of your references and inspirations
  3. Make sketches, testing our your initial ideas
  4. Present to the client and get feedback
  5. Amend and create the final artwork

And finally…some lovely creative advice!

“Don’t be scared to ask for help or try things. Find people who inspire you and encourage you and keep them close. Give yourself space to do whatever you want. Draw, paint, sculpt, read, take photos. Go there, do that thing you’ve been wanting to do for ages, don’t be scared to go all the way there cause it’s easier to edit back than to add more.”

Luthiem

Want to discover more of Luthiem’s gorgeous work? Why not give her a follow on Instagram or check out her website?

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Anita's Digest

Collective creativity is at the heart of Poland’s anti-government protests

Krystyna Engelmayer-Urbańska: https://www.instagram.com/engelmayer

A stream of cars moves through a main road in the centre of Kraków, one of Poland’s largest cities. Darkened car windows are lit up only by a strike of red lightning visible from protestor’s placards. This red lightning strike, created by graphic designer Ola Jasionowska, is a key symbol of the ongoing protests opposing the country’s tightening abortion laws. 

It has been just over a month of consistent protests since a ruling by the constitutional court on October 22nd determined a near ban on abortions. The decision would put forward that those performing or assisting abortions for fetal abnormalities would be criminalised. This would make Poland’s abortion laws some of the strictest in the world. Poland’s ruling party, PiS (Law and Justice) tried to pass a bill to tighten abortion laws in 2016, however mass protest stalled the decision. Currently, protest and collective action has led to government talks that may shift gears in the discussion.

Perhaps a key reason why action by activists has been so successful is because of the creative and collective nature of the actions. Activist Aleksandra Sidoruk discusses how placards are being collected to contribute to exhibitions in galleries and cultural centres in Kraków and Poland’s capital, Warsaw. Aleksandra emphasises that these signal new and exciting ways of engaging in protest. Also, in 2016 a poster initiative named Pogotowie Graficzne (Graphic Emergency) was set up in response to the abortion laws put forward. These visual manifestations of the pro-abortion movement help to immortalise principles of solidarity and community. 

The theme of abortion is at the centre of the protests, as Aleksandra stresses, it is ‘still the glue that sticks us all together’. Yet, this epicentral issue has expanded out to bring together different groups oppressed by PiS. Activists Maja Kunstman and Marlena Lipiarz, both members of the LGBTQ+ community, have been protesting since the onset of the constitutional court decision. They tell me that PiS has been insidiously curtailing the rights of people who identify as LGBTQ+, in part through limiting sex education and condemning non-heternormative families on state controlled television. Yet, Marlena emphasises the power inherent in collective suffering; when I ask her what the protests mean to her, she responds that “we know what discrimination is”. Experiencing discrimination makes it all the more necessary to stand up for others. 

With this in mind, protestors are fighting back in full force. To match the constant noise of on-screen propaganda- that the Polish public are particularly subjected to in the indoor isolation of the pandemic- music pounds from protests. Throughout October in both Krakow and Warsaw, techno music radiated from protest sites, blasting the rhythmic pulse of collective imaginaries. Star Wars Imperial March is played in people’s homes each day at 7pm. This is notably a far cry from England’s ‘Clap for the NHS’. Where well-intentioned rainbows and thank-you banners are splayed across our streets, this performative positivity walks in the shadow of the political anger put to use in Polish homes and streets on a daily basis. As Maja stresses, ‘This is the War’. Below, a placard highlights this sentiment with a tram reprogrammed to read, ‘The Tram of Freedom’. 

Photo: Maja Kunstman
Another placard made by Maja and Marlena, using the format of an action game, shows how protestors are framing the fight for rights as exactly that, a battle that must be won.

Whilst the government tries to curb freedom of communication through criminalising online sharing, this is not hindering the collective power of online protest. Maja and Marlena have set up a Tik Tok for video compilations of the protests. In this way protest takes on a digital body, it moves beyond lived boundaries and into the liminal spaces between government propaganda and criminalisation. Aleksandra demonstrates how pro-abortion charities also help the movement move beyond physical boundaries and borders: Aborcyjny Dream Team (Abortion Dream Team) and Aborcja Bez Granic (Abortion Without Borders) help provide Polish women with abortion aid and resources abroad. To move beyond physical and digital boundaries is to make activist movements transcendent, to enact future imaginaries. 

So, why do we get creative in times of crisis? As Rebecca Solnit argues in her book about histories of collective action, Hope in the Dark, ‘Hope is an embrace of the unknown’. In this unknowable space, movement and change can be enacted out of seemingly nothing. As the Polish government places restrictions on people’s freedom, forms of creative work across digital, physical, and even lyrical spaces expand collective action outwards, and therefore dreams of better futures become cemented realities. 

About Anita

Anita is a writer of all sorts. She has a background in Sociology and Gender Studies. Her main creative pursuits include poetry, short fiction, and articles on social and cultural topics. She often likes to play with the boundaries of fiction and non-fiction, exploring the liminal spaces between these styles. She’ll be updating this column weekly, with fresh, topical discussions about what’s on her mind. Stay tuned!

Categories
Projects

‘Setting up a magazine from scratch’ with Bulb Magazine

22 October 2020

Kat Chojnacka is the creative director, editor, and founder of Bulb magazine. Founded in February 2020, the main goals of the magazine are to gather various artworks made by young creatives, to build a community where aspiring artists can showcase their work, and to create magazines full of art that feels fresh and relevant.

In this meeting, we were lucky enough to hear from Kat about the concept behind Bulb, how the name came about, and the failures and successes she’s experienced along the way.

On why she decided to start Bulb Mag:

“In January we had like a series of networking events organised by our university. And what amazed me is that I actually got to professionally meet people from other courses at my university. And it was kind of like, the first chance to do so in university with our tutors included. I just felt like I was missing out before on the full university experience, because I feel like, as an Art University, we should collaborate a lot and have some sort of platforms to share our work and motivate one another. So I wanted to help build that community. And I was just thinking about what I could do to, you know, help that. And because of my latest interest in InDesign, I thought maybe a magazine is the way to do it.”

On the name ‘Bulb’:

“The initial idea was to name it in a way that it would evoke feelings of freshness. So, at first, I wanted to name it ‘fresh’ or ‘raw.’ But those names were already taken by popular magazines. So I couldn’t settle on that. So I was literally using like a random word generator and just refreshing it all the time to see what names popped up. And there were a lot of that I kind of liked, for example ‘kettle’ ‘milk’, or ‘flesh.’ But they were all taken. I was just checking everything and everything was taken. So the actual name, the name ‘Bulb,’ is not my original idea. Basically I was telling my friend, my flatmate Veronica, how I was struggling with the name and she was like, ‘let’s look around the room, maybe we’ll find something interesting.’ And then she was like, ‘why not Bulb?’ And I was like, I kind of like it. So I settled on ‘Bulb.’ So basically, if you know, the symbolism of bulb, it’s supposed to be intention, or ideas. So I feel like it really gives away that fresh, creative mindset, in a way. And it’s short and catchy, which I also wanted it to be. So yeah, for me, it’s perfect.”

On the main goals of Bulb Magazine:

“The main goals of Bulb are to build a community of young artists, just young creatives wanting to share their work, and to promote them in a way, but also to motivate them. So initially, it was supposed to be for students of the Leeds Arts University, but now it’s more about just young creators in general. I didn’t feel like I should limit anyone and also I actually didn’t know at first that it might get popular some time. And so actually now my friends from Poland are submitting as well. But yeah, to be honest, one of the goals was also to motivate myself as well because I was struggling with motivation to produce more work. And I know that a lot of people from my course, and not only my course, had a difficult time as well, especially in quarantine. So it was, you know, it was just supposed to get us going and keep us on track.”

On failure and success:

“For the first official issue of Bulb I made an open call poster for submissions to the magazine, but I had to redo it, because for the first deadline, I didn’t get any submissions, like any at all. And once again, I was really heartbroken because of that. But I figured that maybe it was just it was just bad timing. So I redid the poster with different dates after university submissions. And then I got a lot of submissions. I mean, by a lot I mean, around 15. It doesn’t seem like that much. But for me, it’s quite a lot. And yeah, I went through three stages, basically. So at the beginning, because of the number of submissions, I was very motivated, and had really high hopes. And then I felt pressure, because there’s so many submissions. And I just felt the need to do it perfectly. And at the same time, it kind of motivated me as well. So at the end, I kind of felt fulfilment, because it’s so much longer than the previous ones. So I really feel like I did everything I could to make your work. And also I’ve created a website alongside, which I didn’t initially intend to do. But then I thought, why not try? Why not give it a go and just create a website?”

Want to find out more? Why not check out Bulb’s website or give Bulb a follow on Instagram.

By Tascha von Uexkull

Categories
Projects

‘Celebrating creative failure’ with Failsafe

“Here to give emerging creatives their first paid commissions and a space to cry”

30 September 2020

In this meeting, we chatted to David Adesanya from Failsafe, a collective of eight young creatives who stumbled across one another at the beginning of their careers. Their recent Kickstarter campaign to fund their latest zine project has been extremely successful. Described as a ‘A handbook about creative failure, made for and by emerging artists looking for solidarity and their first paid commissions,’ it is to be published in early November.

I myself came across Failsafe for the first time at a networking event eponymously titled ‘Failsafe,’ which was a fantastic opportunity to meet other young creatives through interactive tasks, ‘speed dating’ with questions about aspects of your creative process as prompts, and group brainstorming sessions. It stuck in my mind as one of the only networking events I’ve ever been to where I met people who genuinely seemed interested in what I did and, more than that, I felt excited at the opportunity to collaborate with such like-minded individuals. It was certainly the only networking event where I left with everybody’s Instagram contacts as the result of a wonderful initiative from the Failsafe team, who got everyone to write their handles down to avoid that awkward moment where you meet loads of really interesting people and leave having felt too shy to ask for any of their details to follow up with.

David explained Failsafe’s origins, their networking event, and the fantastic opportunities Failsafe is creating for young creatives.

Where the collective first met:

“We initially met two years ago on a photography project called ‘What is your London’ and now all of us are creatives in our own right, working in different industries. For example, I work in architecture and advocacy, but a number of us work within film,
creativity, writing, and photography etc. So we all came together on this challenge to document what our London was.
And we exhibited it at a place called protein studios in Shoreditch, and it was kind of our first time kind of working together.”

How they continued collaborating:

“we began to kind of work on different projects throughout that time. We got picked up by the BBC and started collaborating with organisations like Magnum photos. Once we had our first exhibition, we were like, ‘Okay, how do we continue this steam?’ And so we went to work with Magnum photos on a brief called strangers and basically documenting what strangers meant to us. And again, using our different mediums to be able to do that.”

Failsafe’s networking event:

“we wanted to kind of create community for others to feel comfortable cloud testing and experiment and as we did, and so we ran a workshop called ‘Failsafe.’ And we initially put it out there to creative organisations to spread the word about how we were trying to make people feel more comfortable in their early entry into the creative sector. And initially, we had like, 50 spaces. And then like, in the end, it was like 200 people who were just really interested in wanting to explore this question.

At the event, we had an ‘agony aunt’ where people could write down their concerns and drop them into a box. And we were able to answer the concerns by opening them up to everyone in the session. This was that first reality of a community that we were so interested in, like the things that we were trying to build. And so we began to kind of take this further, and that’s kind of how we lead into the winter of 2020. We began to think okay, ‘how do we solidify this? How do we kind of like build this community beyond just the workshop?’

Progressing beyond the networking event:

We have support from Create Jobs and Mayor’s For London and organisations like that, so we thought ‘okay, we actually have organisations here ready to support us.’ So the team became not One Five [their original name, when the team was initially 15 people], but Failsafe, which was eight of us. Me, Timi, Dubheasa, Eric, Naila, Maria, Marcella, Rachal, and again, like all of us working from working in different creative sectors, but be able to kind of unite together to get that created.”

Failsafe’s brand image:

“It involved a lot of trial and error! It was very much everyone contributing different ideas. And it got to the point where we were getting somewhere with a type of colour scheme, a type of font…and we just built that design guideline. We decided it’s not going to be strict, but it’s going to be something that we lean on. And I think that’s really good for when you’re hiring out others, so for example when we are hiring designers, or editors, or writers, they kind of understand the language of our work. So yeah, that was something that we had to just implement, but it did take time.”

Want to find out more? Give @failsafe a follow on Instagram…

By Tascha von Uexkull

Categories
Projects

‘A snapshot of me’ with photographer Charlotte Dobson

Meeting 3: 16 July 2020

I’m trying to connect to the beauty in the world, as it is something that everyone can see, but is often not appreciated in the fast pace of life.


Assemblage member Charlotte Dobson is an undergraduate photographer at Leeds Arts University. As an emerging photographer, she has had works exhibited and featured in various magazines and exhibitions, namely in Italy and Rome. In this meeting she chatted us about her process, inspirations, and experimentations. Below are some key quotes from her talk and you can download her presentation slides at the bottom of this post:

My approach to photography:
‘Usually have something planned in mind, this usually consists of the subject matter and background, but then I experiment with things like the angles and focus. I have recently been enjoying being more spontaneous, for example, with the photograph of my sister in deep thought whilst setting up the camera (below). So I have been realising lately how capturing something in the moment can be so effective. The mediums that we use can be so powerful in capturing reality.’

What inspires me:
‘Initially I find my phone a useful device to document and record, but I then switch to another medium that I feel can better reflect everything I want to express. I have recently been using film more to push my technical skills, but discovered that I have to be completely calm and undistracted to really make effective images’


Shooting outdoors:
‘I sometimes shoot outdoors with dreamy light, usually early in the morning, just as the sun is coming down. It’s about having patience and using light almost as a director and being less in control, which kind of contradicts the idea of a photographer, but when working with nature, it is about working with it slowly.’


Experimenting with film photography:
‘I think it’s great when different art forms cross over and are able to support and heighten one another. Coming from a fine art background, I have always been pushed to experiment, and have took this further in photography with other technical processes like film. I enjoy working with film photography because it offers an element of surprise. It’s definitely easier to work in the moment more because there are limited shots for a roll, not unlimited like digital, so you have to have a stronger presence with it.’

Working with colour:
‘I like to use black and white photography to emphasise shadows, but I use colour photography when there is really interesting colour, for example bright or moody. This image of my Mum (below) with the black eye gives soft textures on the skin with the background, which contrasts the harshness of the red bruised eye.’

Booking making:
Book making has been an effective
way to portray my interest in creating connections, due to pairings, layout and sequencing. I created a book to do with climate change and animal welfare, to encourage the viewer to simply question their thoughts and beliefs, including poems from other people. I find poems make the work more dreamy and less harsh. I collaborated with a graphic designer to keep it playful as something too harsh might put certain audiences off.’

On photography:

‘Like other art forms photography is also about imagining, not just showing what is there.’

Want find out more? You can check out Charlotte’s other work here: @charlottedobson.photography

Categories
Blog

The top 50 places to find creative opportunities & events

Assemblage members got together to brainstorm the websites, platforms, pages, and resources they use most when hunting for creative opportunities and events.

  1. Arts Jobs
  2. Art Fund
  3. Create Jobs
  4. The Dots
  5. Skillshare
  6. Youtube craft tutorials
  7. @collageclubldn (Instagram)
  8. Dezeen (for architecture projects and events)
  9. 100 day studio by Architecture Foundation (online talks)
  10. The Architecture Social (invite only group)
  11. Eventbrite
  12. LinkedIn
  13. Art UK (good events and content and often have work experience opportunities)
  14. Indeed
  15. Association of Art Historians (especially on Twitter where they retweet very useful opportunities)
  16. Doctoral and Early Career Research Network (Twitter)
  17. The Courtauld Research Forum (Twitter)
  18. British Journal of Photography (BJP – online and published journal)
  19. Daisie – (like The Dots, good for collaborations, they do regular talks by creative professionals)
  20. Canva – (free templates/layouts for social media)
  21. WeTransfer and WeCollect (online tool to share files, can easily be saved in folders with WeCollect)
  22. Calls for Entries website (art and photography calls, some paid entries but also free, large range of opportunities including competitions, exhibitions, funding, portfolio reviews, residencies, and workshops)
  23. Creative Access (job and internship listings)
  24. Spread the Word (Twitter – they post a lot of writing/publishing/submission opportunities)
  25. Instagram (if you follow a lot of magazines and artists, a lot of calls for submissions end up popping up in your story ads)
  26. Facebook events (actually really useful for local neighbourhood events that aren’t well known to be featured anywhere else)
  27. Twitter (for their independent magazine accounts. They post a lot of their calls for submissions on there)
  28. It’s Nice That (an online platform for designers – they also have a separate section called ‘If You Could’ for job hunting)
  29. Facebook Groups (there are endless groups devoted to creative people meeting up for a job or passion project. People will frequently post events or private jobs they might need help with)
  30. StarNow (a site devoted to low budget music video/acting/filmmaking/photography jobs and can be a good way to meet new creative groups)
  31. Journo Resources (their newsletter is really useful newsletter for job opportunities)
  32. Young Journalist Community (a group on Facebook for advice, support, and opportunities)
  33. The Entry Level Audio Network (opportunities for people with little to no experience in work such as radio or podcasts)
  34. Media beans 
  35. The Creative Independent (advice, articles and information on creative work such as zine making)
  36. Team London (for volunteering opportunities)
  37. Museums Association
  38. Leicester Museum Job Board 
  39. Art Quest
  40. Art Net
  41. Seb’s List 
  42. The Barbican email newsletter
  43. National Theatre email newsletter
  44. University alumni careers pages 
  45. Art Rabbit
  46. The Tetley newsletter and events page
  47. University of Cambridge Museums vacancy/opportunities page
  48. Creative Jobs Board (Instagram)
  49. Creative Debuts (Instagram)
  50. Run the Check (Instagram)